Author Archives: George

Street Music conference, May 14-15, Norwich

The conference I am organising with my current postdoc Dr Lizzie Bennett is really taking shape. We have a great programme of around 40 speakers, from academic as well as industry, outdoor arts, festivals, busking and performing backgrounds. And we have a musician-in-residence, Pete Moser. You can read more about Pete’s one-man-band work here. The two-day conference is free to attend, but you need to book a ticket (there are very few left). It is funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities programme, from the UEA. Other speakers include the following.

Dr David Atkinson,  Honorary Research Fellow at the Elphinstone Institute Aberdeen, author of The Anglo-Scottish Ballad and its Imaginary Contexts (2014), and co-editor of Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers (2017)

Chester Bingley, Director, Keep Streets Live

Nick Broad, CEO and founder, Busk.co

Mark Denbigh, Head of Production & Programme, Norfolk & Norwich Festival 

Alex GibsonMusic and Creative Arts Regional Specialist (Bishop’s Stortford), Salvation Army

Prof Trevor HerbertEmeritus Professor in Music at the Open University, author of Music and the British Military in the Long Nineteenth Century (2013), and editor of The British Brass Band: a Musical and Social History (2000)

Kate Jones, Programme Director, Busk in London

Stefano Montes, Researcher in Culture and Society at the University of Palermo, convener of People and Cultures of the World (2019)

Marcus Patteson, Executive Director of Norca and Sistema, Co-founder of Norwich Samba

Mykaell Riley, Senior Lecturer at Westminster School of Arts, Programme Director of the Black Music Research Unit and Principal Investigator for Bass Culture Research 

Veronica Stephens, Executive Director, Seachange Arts 

Dr Lucy Wright, Research Fellow at University of Leeds in School of Performance and Cultural Industries, artistic-researcher.co.uk

Gina Arnold, Adjunct Professor,  University of San Francisco 

Andrew Green, School of Culture & Creative Arts, University of Glasgow

Samuel Horlor,  Music Department, Durham University

Jaime Rollins, author of Lullabies and Battle Cries: Music, Identity and Emotion among Republican Parading Bands in Northern Ireland.

Kelvin Mason, Campaign Choirs Initiative and Campaign Choirs Writing Collective, who have recently published Singing for Our Lives: stories from the street choirs   

Lotte Reimer, Campaign Choirs Initiative and Natural Voice Network

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Rhythm Changes 6 conference: Jazz Journeys

This week, at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Graz (KUG), we hold the 6th of our international jazz conferences, on the overarching theme of Jazz Journeys. There are around 180 delegates coming, which is we feel a big deal. I’m a member of the Rhythm Changes organising team, and have been since we first had EU project funding for our European jazz research. So looking forward to being back in Graz. You can download the conference programme here.

Jazz has typically been the music of journeys and mobility. Its history is inseparable from global patterns of migration and changing demographics, as well as new forms of media communication and cultural production. The music speaks as much to dreams of escape as it does to the desire to put down roots; it continually seeks new pathways to meaning, even as it reinforces old boundaries. Jazz Journeys seeks to critically explore how ideas of mobility, movement, travel, exchange, voyaging, border-crossing and odyssey have shaped – and continue to shape – debates about the music’s past and future. We welcome papers addressing the conference theme from multiple perspectives, including cultural studies, musicology, cultural theory, music analysis, jazz history, media studies, and practice-based research. Within the general theme of Jazz Journeys, we have identified several sub-themes. 

Journeys: mobility and travel

This theme addresses hemispheric or global cultural movements in jazz, from the legacies of transatlantic slavery to the emergence of jazz communities throughout the world. We invite papers that engage with the different kinds of journeys that musicians undertake, from stylistic development to their involvement in the processes of migration and mobility, cross-cultural exchange, colonialism, and empire(s).

Journeys: journees

This theme explores jazz as a companion to everyday life in private and public spaces, in the light of changing modes of interaction with the music. Are new technologies and platforms such as Spotify and Facebook changing the way we deal with jazz? How does jazz feature as a soundtrack to our ordinary existence? How do such regular interactions (or the avoidance of such interactions) reveal ideas about the meaning and value of jazz?

Journeys: journal/diary: history, narrative, (auto)biography

This theme explores the ways in which the experience of music is captured and the story of jazz told, from dominant narratives to (auto)biographies, popular tales to hidden histories. We welcome papers that interrogate dominant forms of causal and linear narration and engage with the ways in which the stories of jazz are written, adapted and changed through time. The theme seeks to engage with the underlying values that shape understandings of jazz and influenced what is celebrated and what ignored.

Journeys: journals/research

Fifty years ago, the founding of Jazzforschung / Jazz Research and Beiträge zur Jazzforschung / Studies in Jazz Research in Graz positioned jazz studies as an important area of musicology and related disciplines. We invite papers that explore the gaps, limitations and tensions in our understanding of jazz research, as well as new directions in the field.

Journeys: journalism, media, technologies

This theme investigates the role of writing, mediatisation and technological change in the production, dissemination, and experience of jazz. We invite papers focusing on the ways in which ideas, sounds and images about the music circulate globally between artists, critics, audiences, and producers.

Journeys: time(s) and temporalities

This theme explores concepts of time and temporality in jazz, from the uses of multiple tempos and time signatures to theories and practices of repetition and revision. We invite papers that respond to the different times, temporalities, tempos, moments, instances, junctures, speeds, passages, and movements in and out of time that characterise jazz history and its practices.

The seduction of alliteration

This theme addresses the many journeys in language, sound, gesture, and image that shape our understanding of jazz, including spontaneous writing, creative writing from the Harlem Renaissance, and Beat literature. We welcome papers that experiment with how to get from A to B, that sound out new ways of speaking of and thinking about jazz, and envision new practices and processes of writing about, and performing with, the music.

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